Category Archives: TipOffs

TipOffs

Why taxpayers should have their tax refund direct deposited

As the 2022 filing season begins, the IRS encourages taxpayers to file electronically when they are ready and choose direct deposit to get their refund. Direct deposit is the safest and most convenient way to receive a tax refund.

Here are some other benefits of choosing IRS direct deposit:

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An overview of the credit for other dependents

Taxpayers with dependents who don’t qualify for the child tax credit may be able to claim the credit for other dependents. This is a non-refundable credit. It can reduce or, in some cases, eliminate a tax bill but, the IRS cannot refund the taxpayer any portion of the credit that may be left over.

Here’s more information to help taxpayers determine if they’re eligible to claim it on their 2021 tax return.

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The maximum credit amount is $500 for each dependent who meets certain conditions. These include:

  • Dependents who are age 17 or older.
  • Dependents who have individual taxpayer identification numbers.
  • Dependent parents or other qualifying relatives supported by the taxpayer.
  • Dependents living with the taxpayer who aren’t related to the taxpayer.

The credit begins to phase out when the taxpayer’s income is more than $200,000. This phaseout begins for married couples filing a joint tax return at $400,000.

A taxpayer can claim this credit if:

  • They claim the person as a dependent on the taxpayer’s return.
  • They cannot use the dependent to claim the child tax credit or additional child tax credit.
  • The dependent is a U.S. citizen, national or resident alien.

Taxpayers can claim the credit for other dependents in addition to the child and dependent care credit and the earned income credit. They can use the IRS Interactive Tax Assistant, Does My Child/Dependent Qualify for the Child Tax Credit or the Credit for Other Dependents?, to help determine if they are eligible to claim the credit.

More information:
Publication 501, Dependents, Standard Deduction and Filing Information

Share this tip on social media — #IRSTaxTip: An overview of the credit for other dependents. https://go.usa.gov/xtKXe


Top 5 things to remember when filing income tax returns in 2022

With filing season beginning January 24, the Internal Revenue Service reminded taxpayers about several key items to keep in mind when filing their federal income tax returns this year.

Given the unprecedented circumstances around the pandemic and unique challenges for this tax season, the IRS offers a 5-point checklist that can help many people speed tax return processing and refund delivery while avoiding delays.

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For Illinois and Tennessee tornado victims, IRS extends 2021 tax-filing deadline, other deadlines to May 16

Victims of December 10 tornadoes in parts of Illinois and Tennessee will have until May 16, 2022, to file various individual and business tax returns and make tax payments, the Internal Revenue Service announced today. This is the same relief already provided to storm victims in Kentucky.

Following last week’s emergency declarations issued by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the IRS is providing this relief to taxpayers affected by storms, tornadoes and flooding that took place starting on Dec. 10 in parts of Illinois and Tennessee. Currently, relief is available to affected taxpayers who live or have a business in Bond, Cass, Coles, Effingham, Fayette, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Montgomery, Morgan,   Moultrie, Pike and Shelby counties in Illinois and Cheatham, Decatur, Dickson, Dyer, Gibson, Lake, Obion, Stewart and Weakley counties in Tennessee. But the IRS will provide the same relief to any other localities designated by FEMA in these or neighboring states. The current list of eligible localities is always available on the disaster relief page on IRS.gov, including numerous counties in Kentucky announced last week.

The tax relief postpones various tax filing and payment deadlines that occurred starting on Dec. 10. As a result, affected individuals and businesses will have until May 16 to file returns and pay any taxes that were originally due during this period. This includes 2021 individual income tax returns due on April 18, as well as various 2021 business returns normally due on March 15 and April 18. Among other things, this means that affected taxpayers will have until May 16 to make 2021 IRA contributions.

In addition, farmers who choose to forgo making estimated tax payments and normally file their returns by March 1 will now have until May 16, 2022 to file their 2021 return and pay any tax due.

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2022 tax filing season begins Jan. 24; IRS outlines refund timing and what to expect in advance of April 18 tax deadline

The Internal Revenue Service announced that the nation’s tax season will start on Monday, Jan. 24, 2022, when the tax agency will begin accepting and processing 2021 tax year returns.

The January 24 start date for individual tax return filers allows the IRS time to perform programming and testing that is critical to ensuring IRS systems run smoothly. Updated programming helps ensure that eligible people can claim the proper amount of the Child Tax Credit after comparing their 2021 advance credits and claim any remaining stimulus money as a Recovery Rebate Credit when they file their 2021 tax return.

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Tax professionals should review data safeguards

With the tax filing season around the corner, the IRS and its Security Summit partners remind tax pros to review their security measures. The Taxes-Security-Together Checklist can help tax professionals identify the basic steps they should take to safeguard their clients and their business.

Here’s an overview of some of those safety measures.

Use multi-factor authentication to protect tax accounts
Practitioners can download to their mobile phones readily available authentication apps offered through Google Play or the Apple Store. These apps will generate a security code. Codes may also go to a preparer’s email or text, but the IRS notes those are not as secure as the authentication apps. Tax professionals can search for “authentication apps” in a search engine to learn more. Continue reading

IRS resources help taxpayers determine if an offer in compromise is the right way to resolve tax debt

Individual taxpayers and business owners can use the IRS’s Offer in Compromise Booklet or the new how-to video series to learn how an offer in compromise works and decide if it could help them resolve their tax debt. Taxpayer’s can use pre-qualifier tool see if they are eligible for an offer in compromise.

An offer in compromise is an agreement between a taxpayer and the IRS that settles a tax debt for less than the full amount owed. An offer in compromise is an option when a taxpayer can’t pay their full tax liability. It is also an option when paying the entire tax bill would cause the taxpayer a financial hardship. The goal is a compromise that suits the best interest of both the taxpayer and the agency.
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Resources to make tax time easier for U.S. service members and veterans

The IRS has a variety of resources to help members of the military, veterans and their families navigate the unique and complex circumstances that come with filing taxes while in the military. Reviewing these resources is a good way to get ready for the upcoming tax filing season.

Here’s a list of some of these resources.

IRS announces new online tool to help U.S. withholding agents validate their 1042-S data prior to filing

IRS Issue Number:    IR-2021-223 | November 15, 2021.

WASHINGTON – The Internal Revenue Service today launched a new online tool designed to help U.S. withholding agents comply with their reporting and withholding responsibilities with respect to IRS Form 1042-S (Foreign Person’s U.S. Source Income Subject to Withholding).

The tool performs a quality review of data before submission to the IRS. Use of the tool does not change a withholding agent’s obligations to file Forms 1042-S with the IRS and furnish a copy of the Form 1042-S to the payee. Continue reading

Why it’s important that taxpayers know and understand their correct filing status

As taxpayers get ready for the upcoming filing season, It’s important for them to know their correct filing status. A taxpayer’s filing status defines the type of tax return form they should use when filing their taxes. Filing status can affect the amount of tax they owe, and it may even determine if they have to file a tax return at all.

There are five IRS filing statuses. They generally depend on the taxpayer’s marital status as of Dec.31. However, more than one filing status may apply in certain situations. If this is the case, taxpayers can usually choose the filing status that allows them to pay the least amount of tax. Continue reading