Tag Archives: Tax Tips

An overview of the credit for other dependents

Taxpayers with dependents who don’t qualify for the child tax credit may be able to claim the credit for other dependents. This is a non-refundable credit. It can reduce or, in some cases, eliminate a tax bill but, the IRS cannot refund the taxpayer any portion of the credit that may be left over.

Here’s more information to help taxpayers determine if they’re eligible to claim it on their 2021 tax return.

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The maximum credit amount is $500 for each dependent who meets certain conditions. These include:

  • Dependents who are age 17 or older.
  • Dependents who have individual taxpayer identification numbers.
  • Dependent parents or other qualifying relatives supported by the taxpayer.
  • Dependents living with the taxpayer who aren’t related to the taxpayer.

The credit begins to phase out when the taxpayer’s income is more than $200,000. This phaseout begins for married couples filing a joint tax return at $400,000.

A taxpayer can claim this credit if:

  • They claim the person as a dependent on the taxpayer’s return.
  • They cannot use the dependent to claim the child tax credit or additional child tax credit.
  • The dependent is a U.S. citizen, national or resident alien.

Taxpayers can claim the credit for other dependents in addition to the child and dependent care credit and the earned income credit. They can use the IRS Interactive Tax Assistant, Does My Child/Dependent Qualify for the Child Tax Credit or the Credit for Other Dependents?, to help determine if they are eligible to claim the credit.

More information:
Publication 501, Dependents, Standard Deduction and Filing Information

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For Illinois and Tennessee tornado victims, IRS extends 2021 tax-filing deadline, other deadlines to May 16

Victims of December 10 tornadoes in parts of Illinois and Tennessee will have until May 16, 2022, to file various individual and business tax returns and make tax payments, the Internal Revenue Service announced today. This is the same relief already provided to storm victims in Kentucky.

Following last week’s emergency declarations issued by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the IRS is providing this relief to taxpayers affected by storms, tornadoes and flooding that took place starting on Dec. 10 in parts of Illinois and Tennessee. Currently, relief is available to affected taxpayers who live or have a business in Bond, Cass, Coles, Effingham, Fayette, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Montgomery, Morgan,   Moultrie, Pike and Shelby counties in Illinois and Cheatham, Decatur, Dickson, Dyer, Gibson, Lake, Obion, Stewart and Weakley counties in Tennessee. But the IRS will provide the same relief to any other localities designated by FEMA in these or neighboring states. The current list of eligible localities is always available on the disaster relief page on IRS.gov, including numerous counties in Kentucky announced last week.

The tax relief postpones various tax filing and payment deadlines that occurred starting on Dec. 10. As a result, affected individuals and businesses will have until May 16 to file returns and pay any taxes that were originally due during this period. This includes 2021 individual income tax returns due on April 18, as well as various 2021 business returns normally due on March 15 and April 18. Among other things, this means that affected taxpayers will have until May 16 to make 2021 IRA contributions.

In addition, farmers who choose to forgo making estimated tax payments and normally file their returns by March 1 will now have until May 16, 2022 to file their 2021 return and pay any tax due.

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Common but costly errors employers should avoid when filing taxes or claiming credits

Employers filing employment tax returns and claiming an employer tax credit should read the instructions for Form 941 and carefully complete the form to avoid mistakes.

Using a reputable tax preparer including a certified public accountant, enrolled agent or other knowledgeable tax professional can also help avoid errors. Mistakes can result in a processing delay or a balance due notice, which could mean additional delays or require filing an amended return.

Here are some important things employers should remember when preparing tax returns or claiming credits.

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Here’s what taxpayers need to know about reporting tip income on their tax return

Generally, income received from any source, including tips, is taxable. Here’s some information to help taxpayers report tip income.

All tips that taxpayers receive are income and subject to federal income tax. Taxpayers must include all tips they receive in their gross income. This includes:

  • Tips directly from customers.
  • Tips added using credit cards.
  • Tips from a tip-splitting arrangement with other employees.
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