You can influence the regulations that affect you!

Compliance, Rules, Regulations and GuidelinesImagine you wake up at 3 am. to a fire alarm in your hotel room on the 15th floor. The announcement from the loudspeaker instructs everyone to exit the building immediately, without using the elevator. What do you do?

This recently happened to me, and after trudging down the flights of stairs and being guided to a parking lot across the street, I was not in a good mood. At least I had pulled on my jeans and grabbed a jacket, as some people were still in their pajamas and were shivering in the chilly morning air.

As you can imagine, we were all relieved, but irritated to learn it was a false alarm. The waiting line for the (very slow) elevators was long, so I decided to walk back up the stairs to my room.  Later, I asked a companion how  many stairs he had to maneuver and he told me he had just gotten into the shower and decided to take a chance that there was no fire and it was only a false alarm.

He beat the odds this time, but what if it had been a real fire? What would you do?

If you’re a risk taker, you’ll do what my colleague did and bet that there’s no fire. If you’re not a risk taker, you’ll be the person in the pajamas scurrying down flights of stairs and shivering in the cool morning air.

One definition of risk is “a situation involving exposure to danger.” Certainly, allowing yourself to ignore a fire alarm is exposing yourself to danger.

Good professional drivers are typically risk averse and female drivers are even less likely to put themselves in a situation involving risk. However, a 2012 study in Norway compared professional drivers to non-professional drivers and found some interesting results.

The study looked at the responses of 1864 individuals of which 113 were professional drivers.  Here’s what they found. The professional drivers took more risks in some areas but had less risky behavior in others.

First, professional drivers were less likely to wear seatbelts, which could be identified as risky behavior.  However, professional drivers were much less likely to operate a vehicle after alcohol consumption. (This could be contributed to the possible loss of a job, but is still a good risk to avoid.)

The report also found that professional drivers were more likely to use phones or other electronic devices while driving than their four-wheeler counterparts. This type of activity is related to the job and the need to communicate with family, friends, customers and carriers, but was more prevalent in commercial vehicles and is identified as risky behavior.

It was interesting to note that the study found differences in how professional drivers take personal responsibility for road safety overall. A person with a strong safety priority will be more proactive in avoiding risks.  Professional drivers have stronger attitudes toward safety because of training and company values, however, due to the higher demands placed on them, they experience higher levels of stress and fatigue which could contribute to lower personal responsibility regarding traffic safety.

It wasn’t surprising to note that the report claims that professional drivers have a negative opinion of non-professionals as they perceive themselves as being more skilled and trained than others.

While the Norwegian study identified drivers by age and gender, they didn’t comment on any risk-taking tendencies for female drivers other than claiming that younger men are the most risk-taking group on the road.

A report from the Social Issues Research Centre focusing on automobile drivers found that women take fewer risks and men are more likely to be in crashes involving speed, or those that occur while passing or on curves.

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety found that male (automobile) drivers were more likely than females to report aggressive driving behaviors and the World Health Organization claims that “masculinity” may be hazardous to health and cited risky driving as one factor.

Women are driven by estrogen, which encourages bonding and connections while men are motivated by testosterone, which results in the desire to win and to demonstrate power.  Women activate the amygdalae, which is the brain’s fear center, more quickly than men.  For these reasons, we can assume the typical female drivers has less risky behavior than men.

Regardless of your age or gender, risk taking on the road is not something anyone, professional or not, should be doing. Ignoring a fire siren in the early morning hours and hoping it’s a false alarm is another form of risk, and one we should all avoid.


Never drive alone, download the Women In Trucking app and stay connected!

Nominate a Distinguished Woman in Logistics!

WIT and Truckstop.com are seeking nominations for the 2017 Distinguished Woman in Logistics Award (DWLA). The award recognizes the achievements and leadership of outstanding individuals involved in logistics in North America.

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As a director on our board, I encourage you to submit a nomination by completing the form at http://www.womenintrucking.org/DWLA by January 13, 2017.

As you know, our mission includes celebrating the success of women who are pioneers in the industry. The DWLA program is open to high-performing women in any field related to logistics, including warehousing, traffic and shipping, supply chain management, third-party logistics, trucking, rail, and maritime cargo. Continue reading

Are you a risk taker? Ellen’s blog for January

Imagine you wake up at 3 am. to a fire alarm in your hotel room on the 15th floor. The announcement from the loudspeaker instructs everyone to exit the building immediately, without using the elevator. What do you do?

This recently happened to me, and after trudging down the flights of stairs and being guided to a parking lot across the street, I was not in a good mood. At least I had pulled on my jeans and grabbed a jacket, as some people were still in their pajamas and were shivering in the chilly morning air.

As you can imagine, we were all relieved, but irritated to learn it was a false alarm. The waiting line for the (very slow) elevators was long, so I decided to walk back up the stairs to my room.  Later, I asked a companion how  many stairs he had to maneuver and he told me he had just gotten into the shower and decided to take a chance that there was no fire and it was only a false alarm. Continue reading

Never drive alone – WIT App

The trucking industry is a close-knit community, especially for professional drivers. However, sometimes a familiar face may be hard to find when you’re out on the road.

Now you can know where your friends are through the new Women In Trucking (WIT) app by Trucker Sam. Currently available in Android version (IOS coming soon!), this app allows you to connect with your friends in real time. When you stop for the night at your favorite truck stop, you’ll be able to open the app and see which of your friends are in the area.

You determine who can see your location, so you can have family members track you as well. Your kids (or grandkids) can see where you are and your spouse will know when to expect you for dinner. Continue reading

Does your recruiting ad attract women?

What makes a word relate better to a male or a female? According to Kat Matfield, who created a gender decoder for job ads (http://gender-decoder.katmatfield.com), “we all use language that is subtly “gender-coded” and this affects job advertising as well.

Matfield based her web-based tool on a study by professors from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada and Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. Her goal is to remove gender bias in hiring, starting with the recruiting ads.

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Before Title VII of the Civil Rights Act was passed in 1964, many job ads were grouped under headings signifying the specific gender of the applicant. For example, stewardesses looked under the job listings for women and truck drivers could find carriers hiring under the listings for men. Continue reading

Who do you trust?

Recently I was traveling along an interstate within a construction area and realized I was merely inches from the driver pulling a set of doubles next to me. As I watched those huge tires alongside my convertible, I recalled an elementary school class about trust.

Our teacher asked us to define the word trust and how it related to our own young lives. She pointed to the chairs we were sitting on and asked us if the act of sitting involved trust. In other words, did we trust the legs of the chair to hold us up? Did we trust the chair to give us the accommodations we expected?

Until that point, I hadn’t thought about trust in that way, but as I slowed through the construction zone with a combination tractor-trailer next to me, it became more clear. Continue reading

How (NOT) to hire women by Ellen Voie

An excerpt from a 1943 transportation magazine has circulated through out the industry.  It has been verified as a true reprint by Snopes, which claims that the author is L.H. Sanders, who wrote the article for Mass Transportation Magazine’s July issue.  The intent was to assist (male) managers in choosing the right women to work in jobs formerly held by men who vacated their positions for military service during WWII.

Although the author seems to be patronizing women, he (or she) was probably not intending to portray females as unmotivated, incapable and fragile as the text appears.  However, the eleven “helpful tips” show us how far we have come in proving our ability to work alongside men in many occupations. Continue reading

Truckers, Heavy Vehicle Use Tax Return (Form 2290) Due August, 31.

This is to remind truckers and other owners of heavy highway vehicles that, their next federal highway use tax return is due on Wednesday, August 31, 2016.

Some taxpayers still opt to file their Form 2290 on paper, the IRS encourages all taxpayers to take advantage of the speed and convenience of filing this 2290 tax form electronically and paying tax dues electronically. Taxpayers reporting 25 or more vehicles must e-file their Form 2290 through an IRS-approved software provider like www.Tax2290.com.
This year’s 2290 tax due date falls on August 31. Hence E-file ASAP to avoid last minute virtual Traffic jam.

The highway use tax applies to highway motor vehicles with a taxable gross weight of 55,000 pounds or more. This generally includes trucks, truck tractors and buses. Ordinarily, vans, pick-ups and panel trucks are not taxable because they fall below the 55,000-pound threshold. The tax of up to $550 per vehicle is based on weight, and a variety of special rules apply, explained in the instructions to Form 2290.
For More information call and talk to our tax experts at 1-866-245-3918 or Write to
support@taxexcise.com.
Start Your Tax 2290 Return, Today!

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Flat 15% OFF for Special User on your 2290 E-file fee!

Attention Truckers! the heavy vehicle use taxes reported and paid on IRS Tax Form 2290 is due now and August 31. is the last date to file. Form 2290 and Schedule-1 copy is a must to register or renew your heavy vehicle with the state and federal authorities for this new tax year 2016-17.

Special Discount OFF – 15% FLAT on your 2290 E-file Fee

For all those who are regular in reading our blogs here is a surprise offer, avail flat 15% OFF* on your Form 2290, Truck Tax return e-file fee. This is valid till August 30. Act fast and Save Big!

Tax2290 app is for the Heavy Vehicle Use Tax payers to e-file IRS Tax Form 2290.

This 15% flat off is applicable for all 2290, truck tax filers, irrespective of the package you choose. Hurry up the dead line is fast approaching and mark your calendar August 31 is the last date. Don’t miss this WoW offer from us, e-file your 2290 tax returns today!

Electronic filing for 2290

For heavy vehicles that is first used on a public highway during July, file Form 2290 and pay the appropriate tax between July 1 and Aug. 31. You must e-file your Form 2290 if you are filing for 25 or more vehicles, however IRS encourages electronic filing (e-filing) for anyone required to file Truck Tax Form 2290 and who wants to receive their IRS stamped/watermarked Schedule 1 proof instantly. With e-file, you’ll get it almost immediately once IRS accepts your e-filed Form 2290.

2290 Call Support

We’re here to take care of your 2290 truck tax needs, call us and talk to our experts at Toll Free (866) 245 – 3918 for all your 2290 questions. Our lines are open from 8:00 AM EST to 7:00 PM EST, we’re open during the weekends to help you through your filing process. Write to us at support@taxexcise.com, for instant reply; you may also connect with us for a quick chat at http://TaxExcise.com.

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Truck Tax Form 2290 is Due Now, Aug. 31. is the last date.

The Federal Heavy Vehicle Use Tax, Form 2290 is due this August 31 and less time left to report it with the IRS. Form 2290 is an annual tax usually reported between July and August for the tax year 2016-17. Form 2290 and Schedule-1 need to be filed and carried in the truck as a proof of payment of this HVUT returns.

August 31st is the Due Date:

This Form 2290 needs to be filed and IRS stamped/watermarked Schedule-1 proof is a must to register your heavy vehicle under your name or in your company name with the state and federal authorities. Year on year this 2290 and schedule-1 should be renewed in your name/company name to renew your heavy vehicle registration with the state and federal authorities. August 31 is the last date and this 2290 truck taxes needs to be paid in full estimating based on the taxable gross weight and the mileage use limit.

E-file with 10% off

Trying e-file for the first time we’re there to guide you step-by-step in completing your tax return. Apply code “HURRYUP” to avail 10% off on your e-file fee, this offer is valid till 21st Aug. Act FAST… E-file is 100% easy and Simple. Continue reading